Eat Out And Keep Healthy And Frugal
Sep30

Eat Out And Keep Healthy And Frugal

While there’s a lot to be said about homemade cooking and how it helps you lose weight and save money, the fact of the matter is that it’s likely you’ll want to go out to eat once in a while. Whether you’re going out with friends or there’s a certain place that makes guacamole like nowhere else, there’s absolutely no reason why you should deny yourself the pleasures of restaurant dining every so often, even if you’re on a budget and trying to live healthily. Just like with anything else in life, there’s a positive, intelligent way to go about eating out on a budget and there’s the not-so-good way. Here are some times to avoid the not-so-good-way. First, try going out for lunch rather than dinner. Most restaurants are cheaper at lunch and the food is just as good. Many restaurants even offer special business lunches, which have multiple courses and are usually steals. Even better, lunch food has a tendency to be lighter than dinner courses, so eating out at lunch may offer you healthier choices than the dinner menu will. If the place you love to go has large portions, try dining out with another health conscious friend and split the plate. The truth of the matter is that the vast majority of restaurants have enormous portions, and digging in to that chili dog meal alone is an excellent way to blow your calorie count out of the water for the rest of the day. Alternatively, ask for a doggie bag and take half your meal home to eat later – after a spot of exercise, perhaps! Order vegetarian. Many restaurants these days offer vegetarian options ” or will at least listen if you tell them to hold the meat. This depends highly on what kind of restaurant you are at, as you’re likely to be unable to ask the guy making you a burger to “hold the meat” However, if there is a vegetarian option available, it’s likely to be lower in calories and just as delicious as its meat-laden counterpart. Last, make it a point to skip dessert. Now, one of the cardinal rules of dieting is not to be overly cruel to yourself, but the fact of the matter is that a giant sundae is likely to have more calories than the rest of your meal combined and will definitely add some dollars to your bill. Enjoy eating out, of course, but don’t go...

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As it turns out diet soda makes you gain weight
Sep30

As it turns out diet soda makes you gain weight

Diet soda, it turns out, may not be the panacea for weight loss that we all thought — and many of us hoped — it was. In fact, a Purdue University study has found that diet sodas may be linked to a number of health problems from obesity to diabetes to heart disease, just like their more sugary counterparts. Susie Swithers, a professor of psychological sciences and a behavioral neuroscientist, reviewed a number of recent studies looking at whether drinking diet soft drinks over the long-term increases the likelihood that a person will overeat, gain weight and then develop other health problems. A new 14-year study of 66,118 women (sup­ported by many other pre­vi­ous stud­ies) found that the oppo­site seems to be true. Diet drinks may be worse than sugar-sweetened drinks, which are worse than fruit juices (but only fresh-squeezed fruit juices).   The study, pub­lished in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, dis­cov­ered some fright­en­ing facts that should make us all swear off diet drinks and products. Diet sodas raised the risk of dia­betes more than sugar-sweetened sodas! Women who drank one 12-ounce diet soda had a 33 per­cent increased risk of Type 2 dia­betes, and women who drank one 20-ounce soda had a 66 per­cent increased risk. Women who drank diet sodas drank twice as much as those who drank sugar-sweetened sodas because arti­fi­cial sweet­en­ers are more addic­tive and are hun­dreds to thou­sands of times sweeter than reg­u­lar sugar. The aver­age diet soda drinker con­sumes three diet drinks a day. You might say that peo­ple who are over­weight and just about to get dia­betes drink more diet soda, but they sci­en­tif­i­cally con­trolled for body weight. And they found the arti­fi­cial sweet­en­ers increased dia­betes inde­pen­dent of...

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